Overview

In the Thomas E. and Alice M. Hales Endoscopy Unit, Phelps gastroenterologists use specialized tools to view, diagnose and treat conditions of the digestive tract with most advanced technology available and a broader range of endoscopic procedures than anywhere else in the Hudson Valley region.

The unit features 9 private rooms with telephone and TV.

Conditions

Abdominal Pain:
Abdominal Pain is sometimes caused by too-tight pressure of the muscle at the bottom of the bile and pancreatic ducts. This condition is called sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD). Often, people are misdiagnosed with pancreatitis or have gallbladder pain after the gallbladder has been removed, when they actually have undiagnosed SOD. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), using X-ray fluoroscopy, can reveal the sphincter, and ERCP with sphincter of Oddi manometry can analyze the muscle. If it is too tight, the SOD can be cured simply by a sphincterotomy that is performed in less than a minute during ERCP.

Acid Reflux and Barrett’s Esophagus:
Barrett’s Esophagus occurs when there are changes in the cells that line the esophagus, which can sometimes lead to esophageal cancer. Acid reflux is the main risk factor for Barrett’s. About 10% of people with chronic reflux disease (when stomach contents backflow into the esophagus) develop Barrett’s Esophagus and one out of 200 with the earliest form of Barrett’s develops esophageal cancer. A screening endoscopy to diagnose Barrett’s takes only a few minutes. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can eliminate Barrett’s by burning away layers of the abnormal cells. The procedure involves a balloon-like device covered with electrodes (called HALO 360 by BARRX). When the balloon is inserted and inflated, the electrodes deliver energy to the esophagus lining for one or two seconds and the diseased tissue is eliminated.

Bleeding in the Small Intestine:
Anemia can be caused by bleeding in the digestive tract. Enteroscopy can reveal the more than 20 feet of small intestine beyond the reach of the standard upper endoscope or colonoscope. The enterescope allows evaluation and treatment of the small bowel without a need for invasive surgery. In addition to determining the cause of anemia, enteroscopy can be used to diagnose and treat patients with familial polyp syndromes and those who have abnormal X-ray imaging of the small intestine.

Colorectal Cancer:
Colorectal cancer is the 3rd most commonly diagnosed cancer and the 3rd leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the US. Polyps in the colon or rectum, which are usually benign, may become cancerous over time. When screening detects colon or rectal polyps at an early stage, they can be removed, and colorectal cancer can be prevented. Screening for colorectal cancer should begin at age 50, or earlier if there is a family history of colorectal cancer or other high-risk factors. Colonoscopy is the preferred procedure to detect colorectal cancer in its early stages.

Other Digestive Diseases and Cancer:
Other areas where digestive diseases or cancer may occur include the linings of the upper and middle digestive tract (esophagus and stomach) as well as nearby organs such as the pancreas, liver and gallbladder.

Zenker’s Diverticulum:
Zenker’s is a pouch in the wall of the throat that results when a muscle in the upper esophagus doesn’t relax. When swallowing, bits of food can get trapped in the pouch and may cause irritation. If the pouch is very large, food may spill into the throat hours after eating.

Treatment

In the Endoscopy Unit, board-certified gastroenterologists are assisted by specially trained Registered Nurses and endoscopy technicians, as well as dedicated anesthesiologists. An anesthesiologist spends time with each patient before a procedure is performed, monitors them during the procedure and during recovery.

Procedures used to detect, diagnose and treat conditions of the digestive tract include:

Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a procedure used to assess digestive diseases and detect cancer. The endoscope allows visualization, and ultrasound (high frequency sound waves) produces detailed images of the linings of the upper and lower digestive tract (esophagus, rectum and stomach) as well as nearby organs, such as the pancreas, liver and gallbladder. Extremely small lesions can be detected, allowing diagnosis and treatment at an early stage when the prognosis is better. During EUS, tissue samples can be obtained with a thin needle in a process called fine needle aspiration. The tissue is then examined by a pathologist. EUS is also considered the “gold standard,” for the staging of esophageal or rectal cancer prior to surgery or chemotherapy.

EUS is also used to evaluate the gallbladder and bile duct. Its superior resolution results in an ability to detect stones in the bile duct in 95% of patients. Abdominal sonography, on the other hand, which is traditionally used for this purpose, detects stones in the bile duct only 50-60% of the time. Undetected stones in the bile duct can cause persistent abdominal pain and/or fever.

ERCP (Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography) uses X-ray fluoroscopy, to reveal the sphincter and ERCP with sphincter of Oddi manometry to analyze the muscle.

Radio Frequency Ablation or RFA (BARRX) is used to burn away layers of abnormal cells to eliminate Barrett’s Esophagus.

Balloon Enteroscopy reveals the small intestine, which is beyond the reach of standard upper endoscopes or colonoscopies.

Doctors & Staff

Specialty: Gastroenterology

Board certified: Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology

Additional languages: Spanish

Primary Practice:
Phelps Medical Associates
777 North Broadway
Suite 305
Sleepy Hollow, NY 10591
(914) 366-5420

Visit practice website

Specialty: Gastroenterology

Board certified: Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology

Primary Practice:
Phelps Medical Associates
Westchester Gastroenterology
777 North Broadway
Suite 305
Sleepy Hollow, NY 10591
(914) 366-5420

Visit practice website

Specialty: Gastroenterology

Board certified: Gastroenterology

Primary Practice:
Phelps Medical Associates
362 North Broadway, 2nd Floor
Sleepy Hollow, NY 10591
(914) 631-2070

Office 2:
Phelps Medical Associates
440 South Riverside Avenue
Croton-on-Hudson, NY 10520
(914) 269-1700

Specialty: Gastroenterology

Board certified: Gastroenterology

Additional languages: Italian

Primary Practice
141 South Central Avenue
Suite 301
Hartsdale, NY 10530
(914) 713-3228

Specialty: Gastroenterology

Board certified: Gastroenterology

Additional languages: Spanish

Primary Practice
220 North Central Park Avenue
Hartsdale, NY 10530
(914) 948-3627

Office 2
1915-25 Central Park Avenue
2nd Floor
Yonkers, NY 10710
(914) 779-7600

Specialty: Gastroenterology

Board certified: Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine

Primary Practice:
19 Bradhurst Avenue, Suite 700
Hawthorne, NY 10532

Phone: 914-594-9494

Specialty: Gastroenterology

Board certified: Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology

Primary Practice
ColumbiaDoctors
180 Marble Avenue
Pleasantville, NY 10570
(914) 631-7727

Specialty: Gastroenterology

Board certified: Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology

Primary Practice:
Phelps Medical Associates
777 North Broadway
Suite 305
Sleepy Hollow, NY 10591
(914) 366-5420

Visit practice website

Specialty: Gastroenterology

Board certified: Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology

Primary Practice:
Phelps Medical Associates
777 North Broadway, Suite 305
Sleepy Hollow, NY 10591
(914) 366-5420

Specialty: Gastroenterology

Board certified: Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology

Primary Practice
2005 Albany Post Road
Suite 15
Croton-on-Hudson, NY 10520
(914) 271-4212

Specialty: Gastroenterology

Board certified: Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology

Primary Practice:
Phelps Medical Associates
Westchester Gastroenterology Associates
777 North Broadway, Suite 305
Sleepy Hollow, NY 10591
(914) 366-5420

Office 2:
Phelps Medical Associates
11 Ashford Avenue
Dobbs Ferry, NY 10522
(914) 269-1990

Office 3:
440 South Riverside Avenue, Ste. 300
Croton-on-Hudson, NY 10520
(914) 269-1700